Dr Steven Gray

Dr Steven Gray


Steven Gray graduated from Trinity College Dublin in 1992. He joined the laboratory of Tomas J. Ekstrom at the Karolinska Institute (Sweden) in 1996 and received his PhD in 2000 (Thesis Title: The IGF-axis in liver disease: Modulation of expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors). He moved to the Van Andel Research Institute in Michigan, USA where he continued his studies on the therapeutic potential of histone deacetylase inhibitors in the treatment of cancer. He also spent some time as a visiting fellow at Harvard Medical School, Boston working on epigenetic therapies for neurodegenerative disease. Returning to Europe, Dr Gray spent some time at the German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ - Heidelberg), and subsequently moved to Copenhagen to work for Novo Nordisk as part of the research team of Prof Pierre De Meyts at the Hagedorn Research Institute working on epigenetic mechanisms underpinning diabetes pathogenesis. Dr Gray is currently a senior clinical scientist at St James's Hospital at the Thoracic Oncology Research Group at St. James's Hospital headed by Dr. Sinead Cuffe and Professor Stephen Finn. He holds adjunct positions at both Trinity College Dublin (adjunct assistant professorship with the Dept of Clinical Medicine), and at DIT (adjunct senior lecturer, School of Biology). Dr. Gray has published over 85 peer-reviewed articles, 11 book chapters and has edited 1 book. He is a founding member on the editorial board of the journal Clinical Epigenetics, and sits on the editorial boards of several International peer-reviewed journals. He frequently reviews grant applications from many International funding bodies and regularly conducts scientific peer-reviews for various research publications. Currently Dr Gray’s research is focussed on: 1. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases RTKs as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of mesothelioma 2. Epigenetic mechanisms underpinning drug resistance in lung cancer. 3. Targeting Epigenetic Readers, Writers and Erasers for the treatment of Mesothelioma and Thoracic malignancy 4. Circulating Tumour Cells 5. non-coding RNA repertoires in Mesothelioma and Thoracic malignancy.

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